Friday, 1 November 2013

An Ambitious Project - Paris In China














Rather mysteriously, very little information about the town has been made available since it’s opening in 2007. This might be because it’s one of the latest in a string of near ghost towns that reveal a very serious problem in China– a property bubble that’s about to burst.


The last known population of Tianducheng is around 2,000, yet the town can comfortably house over 100,000 people. Most people can’t afford to live in the property available in Tianducheng and for now. Tianducheng remains sparsely populated and is now considered as a "Ghost Town", according to local media. Many of the apartments with Parisian-style wrought iron balconies are occupied by groups of migrant laborers working on the continued construction of the community and the French-themed village park next door. This ambitious project is a perfect example of the massive over supply and over valuation of property across China. So why build? Because it promotes GDP growth– the government’s number one priority.

Sunday, 1 September 2013

Crystal Clear Swiss River Verzasca

The Verzasca River, in Switzerland, is known all over the world for its clear, turquoise waters, but until now its beauty had only been captured from the surface. Photographer Claudio Gazzaroli decided to change that, so he put on a diving suit, took his waterproof camera and dived onto the riverbed to take some truly mind-blowing photos.

The 30-km-long Verzasca mountain river originates at Pizzo Barone and flows into Lake Maggiore, in Italy. The river valley is located in the Italian-speaking region of Switzerland and is a popular tourist destination. People come from all around the globe to see the turquoise waters of Verzasca, do scuba-diving and admire its vibrant colored rocks. Most of them prefer to take photos of Verzasca from the mountains that surround it or from the many bridges built over it. But photographer Claudio Gazzaroli wanted to offer a different perspective on this unique wonder of nature. He dived town 50 feet to the bottom of Verzasca and managed to capture the almost unearthly clarity of its waters. ‘I wanted to show the beauty of this place in a new way,’ Gazzaroli said. Looking at his work, one wonders why wee need software like Photoshop when Mother Nature seems to do thing better herself.


















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